IR Heater size 60mm vs 80mm

xboxhaxorz Uncategorized 0 Comments

With the TBRM we chose the 60mm IR heater size instead of the ever so common 80mm. There is also a difference in wattage of 250w vs 400w.  Well the simple explanation for our choice is, there are no chipset packages that large. Typical chip packages are an average of 30mm with the larger sizes being approximately 45mm. So why do we want to use an oversized and overpowered heater for this small package? We dont, and neither should you. IR is newer technology that works very well in regards to heating as it typically focuses the heat on the package, however with larger heaters the heat may spread past the targeted component, and the widely used solution is to mask the area around the chip using Aluminum tape or Kapton tape. By providing a 60mm heater instead of the 80mm heater we reduce the need for any tape masking. Think of it this way, when using a Honton do you use a 50mm nozzle to rework a 20mm chip?

Your IR heaters in the TBRM are lower wattage, why? Well we could increase the wattage of all our IR heaters and provide you with a big number on a sticker slapped on our machine. But that increased wattage is not necessary and essentially a waste of power. Not to mention, your existing wiring will probably not work with a 6000 watt machine. With that much power you will be drawing 27.2 amps on a 220v line which means you will need 6 gauge wire that happens to be extremely thick and expensive. The standard rule in reworking is to utilize the bottom heater in order to provide 70% of the required heat with the top heater providing only 30%. Keeping that in mind, a 200 to 300 watt heater is more than sufficient.

Our goal was to make the machine as simple as possible and we have achieved that. Utilizing 60mm heaters for our top and bottom heaters of our Professional 3 Zone rework station has proven to be more than enough power to rework most modern chipsets. The RFS80 is a unique heater from Elstein and Insat, its circular design is not common in regards to heating elements in both Ceramic IR and Quartz. Redesigning that particular heater and calling it the RFS60 would be more suitable in our opinion.

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